014 | Margaret Kim | The Flip Chick

Margaret Kim, once a teenage Mom herself became a successful property investor and best selling author. She tells Nicola Cairncross about home schooling her kids in Peru while also founding an orphanage for Peruvian teen moms.

Margaret Kim, Chief Chick at FlipChickMillionaire.com is a speaker, best selling author, philanthropist, business owner and one of the most sought after Real Estate investing consultants in the USA.

By developing a simple and easy to understand system, laser focused on building generational wealth, she has helped countless individuals learn how they can “Divorce Their Day Job” and never have to live paycheck to paycheck again.

She has been profiled and featured on Wall Street Journal, ABC, NBC… Margaret’s passion is to help other realize their full potential. She is the founder of Kyuki-Do Wasi, Home for Teen Moms. She started the home in Peru in early 2013.

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FlipChickMillionaire.com
Peru For Life

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Nicola: Hi, I’m Nicola Cairncross, and you’re listening to “The Money Gym” podcast, where I interview successful entrepreneurs and investors, and ask them, if they could go back in time, and give their younger selves one big tip about money, what would it be? I really hope you enjoy the show.

Margaret Kim, once a teenage mom herself, became a successful property investor and best selling author. She’s the chief chick at FlipChickMillionaire.com. She’s also a philanthropist and one of the most sought after real estate investing consultants in the USA. By developing a simple and easy to understand system, laser focused on building generational wealth, she has helped countless individuals learn how they can “Divorce Their Day Job” and never have to live paycheck to paycheck again.

She has been profiled and featured on Wall Street Journal, ABC, NBC and her passion is to help other realize their full potential. She is the founder of Kyuki-Do Wasi, Home for Teen Moms. She started the home in Peru in early 2013. Tell me what the things you’ve learned about money along the way of the things you’ve already mentioned. Is there anything else you’d like to share with a new aspiring entrepreneur?

Margaret: Well, I grew up with a family that was very anti-wealth sentiment, my dad, if it’s the nasty, evil, rich Republicans, and we still be, I mean, we banter about it now. But that really was what I was taught growing up that it’s the rich people, not us, the rich people have money, and they’re selfish, and they got it by being shady, they’re dishonest and just every negative association loan to having wealth.

I had to be deliberate about undoing a lot of that about changing my perspective on what does it mean to have wealth and again, now my perspective is that it is something that I feel that I have to do to be able to help people in the way that I feel like, it’s my responsibility to help. I can’t do the things I want to do, I couldn’t open up an orphanage without the financial resources.

I could sit there and feel bad for these girls or I could go out and do and I can’t, I couldn’t make money in Peru. But I can come back home and I can kick butt with it. I can make enough money to support that so that they have an opportunity. They’re not going to learn what I teach because that’s not a strategy for a third world country.

But I can use my resources to create something for them, we’re actually opening up a bakery that the girls are going to be able to work at and be able to sell bread and then also learning English because it’s a huge tourist community. So if they learn English, they will be in the top 10% of the people in the country.

Nicola: They’ll be able if they got skill as well and then they’ll be able to go work in the hotels and all sorts of things. So you really had to unpick a lot of programming for your background then. Did you get a mentor for this? Or did you just work on catching yourself every time you had a fault that was less than helpful?

Margaret: I’ve studied a lot under Tony Robbins. I would say he had the most impact on my belief system about money. Now that it’s not gaining to get it’s gaining to give.

Nicola: There’s nothing wrong with that and the more you can help yourself, the more you can help other people I bet your kids are going to grow up with a very healthy attitude to money.

Margaret: Very healthy.

Nicola: Well, Tyler going to work not even spending the money.

Margaret: It’s interesting I look at my husband, he grew up, he’s born in the United States, but his parents are from Korea. They came with a very different financial blueprint, that you work hard for your money. You support the family and the business. So my husband had an interesting disconnect between working hard and making money.

So Tyler, he would go to work at the coffee shop because it was fun. My husband would help because it’s the obligation to the family. So he had a similar undoing about you don’t do it just because you’re doing the right thing. It is okay to work hard with the expectation of making a lot of money. It’s not dirty. It’s not wrong, because you can do so many good things with that.

Nicola: You’ve been listening to Nicola Cairncross on “The Money Gym” podcast. If you’d like to find out more about The Money Gym and how we can help you become more financially intelligent, just come on over to themoneygym.com. We’ll see you over there.


If you want to get control, get out of debt, make more money then grow that money by becoming a confident investor, check out the amazing offer we are making around “The Money Gym” book today! 

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